Make You Fink on Friday

Water

Water - the oceans are full of it

There’s plenty of water, the oceans are full of it.

But the water on land is the problem. It is disappearing. Man is using too much and nature can’t replenish it fast enough.

In some parts of the world water is already at crisis level and beyond; and this phenomenon is spreading. It won’t be that long before many parts of the world are similarly affected.

The last drop: If ground water levels in rural Rajasthan do not improve, these women could be waiting a long time

“Surrounded by the rocky Aravalli hills, Rajasthan is one of India’s driest states. Despite good rains this year, water has always been an issue here.

But the problem now is that beneath the lush, green, irrigated fields of north-western India, the groundwater is fast disappearing.

In Neemrana, about 150km (95 miles) from Delhi, this has been made worse by human intervention.

Situated on the national highway, this area is part of the industrial development under the Delhi-Mumbai industrial corridor.

The highway is dotted with industries including many water intensive breweries and bottlers.”

Source: BBC News Read more

Now don’t go thinking “oh, that’s in India, it doesn’t concern us;” because it does!

What is happening in India is a result of irresponsible planning, and make no mistake – your politicians are just as irresponsible.

The popular belief that the earth’s water is supplied by rivers, is in the main false. While we do get water from the rivers for irrigation and industry, we get far more from underground; from the aquifers that lie hidden from sight. These aquifers are not being replenished, we just keep taking water, more water and even more water until there will be none left.

Because the aquifers are out of sight, they are out of mind. We don’t think about them. They are like the trash we sweep under the carpet.

What is an aquifer?

44 percent of the U.S. population depends on groundwater for its drinking water supply

  • Private household wells constitute the largest share of all water wells in the United States — more than 13.249 million year-round occupied households have their own well.
  • Other kinds of wells are used for municipal systems, industry, agriculture, and quality monitoring. Groundwater accounts for 33 percent of all the water used by U.S. municipalities.
  • Michigan, with an estimated 1,121,075 households served by private water wells, is the largest state market, followed by Pennsylvania, North Carolina, New York, and Florida.
  • Irrigation accounts for the largest use of groundwater in the United States. Some 53.5 billion gallons of groundwater are used daily for agricultural irrigation from 407,923 wells.
  • More than 15.9 million water wells for all purposes serve the United States.
  • Approximately 500,000 new residential wells are constructed annually.

Some facts from National Groundwater Association, Read more

Every drop counts

The aquifers cannot sustain this usage and abuse. And man WILL pay for his folly.

What is happening in Rajasthan, India will happen in many parts of the world, some of those parts may well be your neighbourhood.

Next time you turn on a tap (faucet for our American cousins – God alone knows why you call it a faucet…) remember, each drop holds the future of the planet.

NewsFlash – Update

Here’s a comment from a Stumbler…

“Excellent – actually had someone tell me, not long ago, that there was plenty of water and we’d never run out. Oh yeah? How naive!”

Shows my point perfectly. People just DON’T KNOW and DON’T UNDERSTAND!

Thanks Small Footprints

 

 

2 responses to this post.

  1. Many people just don’t get that there is a finite amount of drinkable water … when it’s gone, it’s gone. The truth in your statement … each drop holds the future of the planet … is profound!

    Like

    Reply

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