Change the World Wednesday – 23rd Apr

Update

A month ago in my Monday Moaning I wrote of the plight of São Paulo, Brazil’s biggest city.

They didn’t have water. The reservoirs that supply the city were down around the 30% mark.

Jaguari Dam - Responsible for 45% of Saõ Paulo's water

Jaguari Dam – Responsible for 45% of Saõ Paulo’s water – image: Diario Central

A month later and the plight has become critical, the reservoirs have fallen to 11.9% of their capacity (last night’s news).

Now literally, they don’t have water.

The water company is pleading with people to save water, substantial discounts are being offered to those who reduce their usage by 20% from their previous average, those who use more than their previous average will be fined heavily.

Don’t say, “But that can’t happen here!” Because it is happening! NOW!

In some areas of the world the water situation has become serious, it’s up to you to see it doesn’t get worse.

Back to our regular programme…

The problem with rabbit food is that one good fart and I'm hungry again

The problem with rabbit food is that one good fart and I’m hungry again

The BIG question!

Did I go vegan for a day? The answer is no… I did two days. Nothing fancy, just simple salads and a home made garlic and herb vinaigrette.

I did it this time just to show you I could, normally I don’t plan them, they just happen, and normally they are more vegetarian than vegan; I do like eggs and cheese with my salad.

In my perambulations for last week’s post, I did fine this. Grateable and meltable vegan cheese on Bunny Kitchen. Just thought I’d say.

Without this fellow and his ilk, there wouldn't be life on the planet

Without this fellow and his ilk, there wouldn’t be life on the planet

 Bees…

Yes, this week’s CTWW is about bees.

Click the banner for the full post

We’ve all heard that Bee populations are declining. Since bees pollinate the majority of our food crops, worldwide, their decline is a cause for great concern. Why are they in trouble? Research points to GMO agriculture and the use of pesticides. It’s time to take action! Here’s your challenge …

This week, take action to protect honey bees. Please choose at least one action from the following list:

  • Plant at least one native, flowering plant in your yard. Avoid hybrid plants … they don’t produce enough nectar or pollen and are useless to bees and other pollinators.
  • Plant a vegetable garden.
  • Let pests live (natural pest controllers, like Lady Bugs, need them for food).
  • Keep your lawn and garden pesticide-free.
  • Eliminate chemicals in your home.
  • Provide a year-round, clean source of water for bees (rainwater collection, a small garden water feature, bird bath, etc.).
  • Leave some dead trees or plants in your yard … bees will nest in them. Or, place a bee house in your garden.
  • Buy organic food.
  • Take up beekeeping.

Well, let’s see how I stack up with that lot.

Attracts big black bees in the late afternoon. Honey bees are too small to pollinate these

Attracts big black bees in the late afternoon. Honey bees are too small to pollinate these

My most prolific flower is the passion fruit; I currently have three that I am training along the house, fence and garage, and more in the plantling stage, three in the ground and about twenty saplings in a planter as standbys.

I have a few tomatoes and garlic around, mainly I have herbs and fruit.

The gulf fritillery caterpillars must be destroyed, or they eat the passion fruit vines to death. Other than that, insects are free to roam.

My lawn is pesticide free, in fact, my lawn is lawn free… I don’t have one.

We talked about harmful chemicals a couple of weeks ago. I am experimenting with orange and vinegar air freshener so that I have one less chemical.

Aedes aegypti plays Dengue once, dengue twice you're dead

Aedes aegypti plays Dengue once you’re sick, dengue twice you’re dead

Now the water feature here is a no – no.

Standing water is used by the Aedes aegypti mosquito to produce larvae, Aedes aegypti is the source of dengue fever, which is deadly, and seriously prolific here in many city areas.

Yes, lots of dead material around here, but not enough for natural beehives.

Buy organic, when I can.

Oh, the neighbours would be up in arms if I did that. My area is urban, the houses very close together. The authorities would pounce with a heavy pounce.

Well, there’s my summary.

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8 responses to this post.

  1. Congratulations for the vegan for two days! Well done. Thanks for the cheese recipe too. It looks good.

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  2. Thank you for your updates on Sao Paulo’s water plight, it is really very worrisome. I mean, Brazil is _not_ arid California. I read in an article from Globo.com (aided by Google translate) that if you consume more water than average, you get to pay a higher rate, whereas frugal users get a discount. That carrot-and-stick approach makes so much sense. It is, in spirit, the same as the carbon fee-and-dividend proposed for CO2 emissions in the US, except that is so far only wishful thinking on the part of Citizens Climate Lobby.

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    • >CelloMom, I can’t understand why it fobbed you off as spam. Yes, users who reduce their consumption by 20% get a 30% discount on their water bill. Apparently, it is getting results. But there is a problem with constitutionalists saying that this goes against Brazil’s constitution and should be stopped.

      We have to take some drastic measures now, or they will be worse in the future.

      AV

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      • Wow that is a big discount, no wonder it works. So the “constitutionalists” are saying that the Brazilian constitution is against helping the poor and the planet? Why invoke it if the conservation measures are getting results? (I suspect this is not about the constitution).

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      • Political correctness, maneuvering, who knows what drives some people, or what their motives are?

        AV

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  3. Thank you for your updates on Sao Paulo’s water plight, it is really very worrisome. I mean, Brazil is _not_ arid California. I read in an article from Globo.com (aided by Google translate) that if you consume more water than average, you get to pay a higher rate, whereas frugal users get a discount. That carrot-and-stick approach makes so much sense. It is, in spirit, the same as the carbon fee-and-dividend proposed for CO2 emissions in the US, except that is so far only wishful thinking on the part of Citizens Climate Lobby.

    (This is really CelloMom, I apologise for the stupid “Jo Cello”, a trick to let WordPress’ tightened spam filter let me through!)

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  4. […] My fertiliser comes from my compost heap, and I don’t use pesticides in the garden. I do have fly spray in the house for mosquitoes (remember the dengue fever issue from last week’s post. […]

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