Posts Tagged ‘BPA’

Change the World Wednesday – 19th Mar

Clorinha’s first baby photo

Still crazy, this week I’m here at 1am. It’s too hot to sleep despite the fan. We had 43ºC (that’s hot, even in ºF – 110 something).

Let me introduce you to Clorinha. She’s still at home with Mommy, and will be for another two weeks. I have called her Clorinha because Daddy was Cloro (bleach), and she’s a little girl Cloro, she has the same markings as her Dad.

CTWW isn’t actually up yet on Reduce Footprints, but I was here, so you get the introduction.

Yes, in a can

Yes, in a can

One thing I have changed in my life since I have become more environmentally aware, cans. I avoid cans like the plague.

I restrict my cans to sardines, I love canned sardines in olive oil on toast, and I have an emergency ration of feijoada (black baked beans with meat) which is easily heated without having to cook a whole meal in the evening which also heats up an already hot house.

I use about one can of each a month, sometimes less.

At my advancing age, a little more BPA can’t do too much damage. My endocrines are already disrupted.

But I generally stay away from canned goods, including drinks and beer.

However, last week at the supermarket, I weakened. I saw these wonderful cans of Guinness. Now I live in Brazil, Brazil does not make a good beer.

Four cans just leapt off the shelf into my shopping cart

A few weeks ago I bought two bottles of Stout made in Brazil. It was so unpalatable that half the first bottle went down the sink, the other relegated to the shelf in the beer box. To call this product stout was criminal, it was no more stout than caramelised pigs’ swill.

Now to find a quality brew like Guinness is a rarity here, I weakened. I would have preferred bottles, but they weren’t available.

Oh, and the stout was like heaven.

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CTWW is up now, but I’m going back to bed. I have had a quick read and will visit some of your blogs later when  the head is a little clearer and I have coffee.

This week’s challenge is a little easier.

This week, do not use or buy any paper towels or napkins. Instead, use cloth napkins and cleaning rags.

 

OR … If you never use paper towels or napkins, please review your paper use and determine if there are other ways for you to conserve. Can you use less toilet paper? Could you say “no” to printed receipts? What about printer paper, gift wrap, magazines and catalogs … can you give them up? Choose at least one area where improvements could be made.

 

OR … If you’ve basically eliminated paper from your life, please share your tips and ideas for doing so.

Part One

I do have a roll of paper towels in the kitchen, I bought a double pack about two years ago, and have just started the second roll. The last time I used one was to hold a juicy homemade hamburger more than a month ago. In my defence, I will say that I bought them before the previous CTWW challenge not to use them.

Part Two

If I used less toilet paper than I do, I’d be using my finger. I generally use one double piece for a wipe, then have a bum shower with soap and water.

Other paper reduction, I have stopped paper bank statements, I use the net.

I don’t buy magazines or newspapers, so there’s no problem there. Junk mail is a problem, not a big problem as most of it is little A5 sized flyers, the plain paper ones go on the compost heap, but the bigger glossies come at the rate of about two a week. Brazilian delivery does not understand “No Junk Mail”, although I have had strong words with some when I catch them. Which is why I am the neighbourhood velho caduco (grouchy old man).

Part Three

I can’t make any claims there. I use scrap paper for notes alongside my PC. Old papers used on one side get folded in four. I have a printer, but only print essentials for work on recycled paper. It hasn’t been used for more than two months, it’s probably rusted up.

Well, there you have it; my CTWW.

Monday Moaning

Why?

A new innovation in the beer can market. But they still use BPA to line the cans. How about an innovation that gets rid of the BPA?

The first American brewery to use this sort of can, which was first introduced at the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.

ToplessCan

Advocates of this model talk about the enhanced aromatic experience. I also imagine more opportunities for people to spill beer on each other….

It’s still bullshit until you get rid of the BPA, without substituting it for BPS (which is reportedly more dangerous).

Industry sources say the risk is very low.

Independent sources say there is a risk.

Who do you believe?

Monday Moaning

This is my 100th Monday Moaning…

Nobody does Nuthin’!

There is so much crap out there and it appears as though nobody is doing anything because things are just getting worse.

It doesn’t matter whether it is the climate, global warming, CO2 emissions, pollution, GMOs, industrial and agricultural poisons, BPA, just to name a few.

We have become complacent.

Isn’t life worth fighting for? Have we all rolled over and are playing dead?

Daily, I read the news, the more I read, the more despondent I become. I am at the tail end of life, soon it won’t matter for me, but I am leaving children and grandchildren who are going to pay for our collective apathy.

The people who generally read this blog are not included in the apathetic, they try in big and small ways. But the people who should be in control are the apathetic ones, the politicians, the governments, the media, the organisations who are there to protect us, and they are not.

When are we the people going to take our power back?

Because if we don’t, there’s going to be a lot more suffering in the future, your children, your grandchildren.

</rant>.

Change the World Wednesday – 23 Oct

food-labelling-and-barcoding

Basic human right, we have the right to know what we are eating and putting on our bodies

Last week’s post was about human rights and the right to know what we are eating through labelling.

I am going to extend that thought with today’s post.

First my weekly update:

Cloro is learning that the kitty litter (sand) box is outside more than inside, she’s getting the meassage.

The second lot of chili peppers have been bottled and the third lot would have been picked today, if exhaustion hadn’t over taken me. Which is the reason I am running late with this post.

This is my beefless week. For those of you who have been following my posts will know that several months ago I decided that the first and third full weeks of any month are ‘beefless’. I have continued with this theme since then. This week so far: Monday, poached sole (halibut) fillets with potatoes in milk and a delicious parsley white sauce. Tuesday, leftovers. Today, chicken breast with the last of the parsley sauce. Tomorrow, curried pork sausages; this will continue until Sunday.

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On with this week’s CTWW challenge:

The subject is BPA.

This week ban BPA from your life. Need some ideas? Avoid canned foods, including prepared soups, vegetables, sauces, soda and beer. Don’t microwave polycarbonate plastic food containers. Say no to printed receipts; they contain BPA.

 

OR … If you live in a country which bans BPA (Canada and Europe both ban this toxin), then please consider other ways to ensure food safety in your home. For example, defrost food in the refrigerator rather than at room temperature (which encourages the growth of harmful bacteria). Take a look at your pots and pans and make plans to replace any, which may leach chemicals into your food, with safe cookware like cast iron or stainless steel (here’s a hint … any coated pans or “non stick” varieties are unsafe). Avoid packaged, pre-cut produce which may be washed in a solution containing chlorine.

Brazilian canned beer. I don't even buy the first one in bottles, hate it.

Brazilian canned beer. I don’t even buy the first one in bottles, hate it.

Principally, I do this already. I don’t buy canned beer.

I don’t buy soda, period!

I don’t buy prepared veges in a can, and I don’t microwave anything. Remember my thoughts on microwaves is that they should all be consigned to the dump. Search ‘microwave’ on this blog and you will find my thoughts there.

I do, however get printed receipts. I was totally thrown by the fact that they have BPA. I’ll have to look into that. But receipts here in Brazil are required when returning/exchanging purchases.

aspargosGenerally, I buy in glass, doesn’t matter if it is beer or asparagus (can’t get fresh asparagus here). This is acceptable, but they also have insipid white shit, that I have never tried, nor want to.

The only thing that I buy in a can are sardines in olive oil. I’ve never seen them any other way. But I don’t buy tuna nor salmon in a can.

I also shun products in plastic whenever possible. Cheese spread for example, if I can’t find it in glass, I go without. This attitude has been part of my life for years, even before I learned about BPA.

I’ll add a warning here. Many companies have done away with BPA, and say so on their products; they have replaced it with BPS, which is several degrees worse, but the furore hasn’t reached the public yet through companies being super-secretive about the change.

Aluminium saucepans

Aluminium saucepans

In the second part of the challenge, cooking ware is mentioned. One of the most contaminating materials in your kitchen is aluminium (aluminum for our American cousins). Aluminium pots and pans leach the metal into your food and this contamination has been linked to things like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

I have two aluminium pots in my kitchen, they bget used as little as possible, but then at my time of life I am silly enough anyway, a little bit sillier probably isn’t that important. But, for young families with kids, they should be consigned to the scrapyard.

In the main, I use steel or cast iron, although I do have a coated non-tick frying pan which produces the most heavenly fried eggs, which would be even more heavenly if I had a source of farm fresh eggs.

Products packaged with BPA or BPS should be labelled as such.

So, yes, I do participate in this week’s challenge, and in some aspects have done so for years.

Monday Moaning

Greenwashing

Look, no paint!

I have written on this before, but that blog disappeared. But the latest move by Coca-Cola to ‘greenwash’ its product is a farce.

A can without paint.

How lame is that?

Of course the move is hailed as going green. But going green has nothing to do with it. Just think of the money the company will save, just think about the increase in profits, just think will that saving be passed on to the consumer?

Like shit it will!

Until they fix the problems INSIDE the can there is no way Coca-Cola can be considered ‘green,’ it will always be RED!

:: 1 – Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a product that is used to line metal (inc Aluminium) cans to prevent spoilage; that is among many other things like baby bottles, baby food cans, etc.

Coca-Cola has not denied when asked by Environment Working Group (EWG) in 2009, in fact they said nothing. Read the report.

:: 2 – The use of High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) in place of sugar. Read the Accidental Hedonist about Why Coke uses High Fructose Corn Syrup. Here’s an extract:

“Some quick numbers, on why Coke would use HFCS over sugar.

Annual US Per capita consumption of Coke in servings: 411

People in the United States: 297,890,000

Servings of Coke in the US, per year: 122,432,790,000

How much a 5 cent cost increase in sweetner, per serving, would affect the bottom line of Coca Cola: $6,121,639,500″

That’s BILLIONS!

Then there’s this from Wikipedia: “The highly processed substance is more harmful to humans than regular sugar, contributing to weight gain by affecting normal appetite functions, and that in some foods HFCS may be a source of mercury, a known neurotoxin.”

Aspartame, a product initially used in chemical warfare

:: 3 – Coca-Cola Diet and Coca-Cola Zero, this is just wonderful, they is sweetened with aspartame, now recognised as a neurotoxin.

Check this quote: “During the Gulf War (not Iraq), ten thousand soldiers were victims of poisoning by Coca-Cola light. A Coca-Cola light é adoçada com aspartame. The Diet Coke is sweetened with aspartame. Durante os combates, os paletes com as latas ficavam expostas ao sol muito quente nessa região. During the fighting, the pallets with the cans were exposed to very hot sun in this region.

A partir de From 33°C 33 ° C , o aspartame se transforma em metanol (álcool metílico), muito tóxico, que, depois, se reduz a formaldeído (formol), ainda mais tóxico. , Aspartame turns into methanol (methyl alcohol), very toxic, which then reduces to formaldehyde (formalin), even more toxic. E o que acontece no estomago a 37° C? And what happens in the stomach at 37 ° C?

Aspartame was invented by Monsanto during chemical warfare.”

Chemical warfare, now isn’t that just ducky?

With global warming many other areas of the world are being exposed to high temperatures, doesn’t this ring alarm bells?

It doesn’t matter if the can has freakin’ polka dots, it’ll NEVER be green until these issues are addressed.

In the meantime, just keep feeding it to the kids so that Coca-Cola can continue to make a profit.

Greenwashing, Bah humbug!

Brazil Joins the Ranks

Ban Bisphenol Globally

Brazil has become one of the few countries to ban bisphenol-a (BPA) in baby bottles and products throughout the country.

ANVISA (Brazil’s National Health Watchdog) in a decision of recent studies abroad that show exposure to BPA is not in the best interests, particularly in infants fro 0 – 12 months.

Bisphenol-A is present in the polycarbonate used for baby bottles and can linings used for drinks and prepared foods and found to be responsible for many conditions and ailments.

With a time limit of 90 days, manufacturers and retailers have to have the products off the shelves by 31st December this year.

Brazil joins the European Union, Canada, China, Malaysia, Costa Rica and the 11 states in the USA who have had the good sense to believe the research and reports.

The Paradox

While the market for alternative technologies to BPA is growing rapidly, virtually all those alternative products, besides glass, are less known that BPA itself.

Are we trading one risk off against another?

Is the cure worse than the disease?

Once again, this is a clear example that man has no idea what he is really doing.

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