Posts Tagged ‘milk’

Change the World Wednesday – 7th Jan

The first CTWW of 2015.

Small will be back in a couple of weeks.

Most of the people who read this blog are already ‘green’. As I said in a comment last week, I sometimes feel as though I am preaching to the converted, but I look at it positively, if I can reach just one more person…

This week’s challenge is something small.

Look at everything you have changed, or aspects of life that are now different; how can you can waste less of just one thing.

or

If you have already made a small change this year, tell us about it.

Over the past year, I have changed my life, in particular, my diet. I am not dieting, heaven forbid, dieting is a myth, counting calories is counterproductive; and I have read this week that ‘flushing toxins’ out of your body is a fallacy.

So what did I do?

I have changed some of the liquids that I used to drink. Previously, I wasn’t beyond drinking Coca Cola and boxed fruit juice and my milk intake was a lot, often more than a litre per day.

cubalibreFor the past year, I have all but stopped drinking all soda; I still have a little coke if I make a Cuba Libre, but I have had only one since I gave up soda.

Fruit juice in a box, don’t even think about it. I buy or grow fresh fruit and make my own juice without sugar,

I still drink beer. In fact my beer consumption has risen since the silly season; mainly because I have had less students and more free time. After carnival the students will return and I will have less free time.

My milk consumption is down drastically. So much that the last two litre boxes of milk went sour in the fridge before I could use them all; because I now only have milk in my coffee, and maybe one cold chocolate drink a week in the evening, whereas before it was a nightly ritual.

So, what did I do with the last box? Because I was sure that it would be sour in the morning and end up going down the kitchen sink too.

Before the milk went sour, I filled an ice cube tray with the last and put it in the freezer.

This morning I made my coffee as normal and put two milk cubes in it.

The milk cubes turned yellowish, but taste normal

The milk cubes turned yellowish, but taste normal

Okay, that’s a small change, but it reduces waste and saves about half a litre of milk. I have enough frozen milk for coffee for the next three days.

So, what do I drink instead of Coca Cola? Sparkling mineral water! It’s also cheaper than Coke. So the saving is twofold, health and finnancial.

The end result was a weight loss without dieting and I counted not a single calorie. I just made changes.

How much weight have I lost… about 20kgs (44lbs).

I can walk easier, I have less reliance on my walking stick, I can’t yet run up the stairs at work, but I can walk up in a semi-normal fashion instead of taking them one at a time which was laborious.

So small changes can make a big difference.

What have you done, or what can you do this year?

Satireday on Eco-Crap

vegans

Satireday on Eco-Crap

ifyoudidntdrinkallmine

Monday Moaning

Stupid laws.

Comments from my Make you Fink on Friday post made an old issue raise its ugly head.

The world is full of stupid laws that prevent people from living their lives as they want to.

The one in question is the zoning laws that outlaw earth ship type houses, but there are many others.

To my way of thinking, when you buy land, it is yours. If you want to build a castle, a house or an earth ship, that is your decision and the local authorities have no say in the matter.

Earth ships are usually free form and reflect sustainable living

Earth ships are usually free form and reflect sustainable living

An Earthship is a type of passive solar house made of natural and recycled materials (such as earth-filled tires) – Wikipedia

But local authorities ban them, why?

There will come a time when this type of dwelling is necessary.

They are not ugly buildings, quite the opposite, they conform to nature.

Another stupid, stupid law prevents most people from growing their tomatoes and other veges in the front yard or areas that can be seen from the street.

Criminal activity, growing veges in the front yard

Criminal activity, growing veges in the front yard

Why can’t you grow veges in the front yard, if you choose this form of self-sufficiency, you should be awarded.

But you can only grow flowers… You can’t eat flowers!

The criminals are the ones who complain that front yard vege gardens ruin the neighbourhhod, it is these people who are responsible for our declining society.

Yet another stupidity. Why can’t we buy fresh milk? But we have to buy the crap sold in supermarkets.

Just look at that full cream at the top of those jars

Just look at that full cream at the top of those jars

We are forced by law to buy milk that has been pasteurised, homogenous, ultra heat treated and had the crap beaten out if it, because if we don’t the bastard dairy corporations won’t make a profit.

One of the biggest cons; skim milk, sold as ‘low fat’ or diet milk. Skim milk has part, or all the butterfat removed, what’s left has no use in the human food chain. When I was a kid it was slops feed to the pigs… maybe it still is. Because they sell it at the same price as ‘whole’ (which it isn’t) milk; raking in even more profit from the gullible.

If we choose to buy milk direct from the source, why can’t we. “It’s bad for the health! It’s full of bacteria!” Bullshit! I have been drinking whole unpasteurised milk almost most of my life (60+ years), neither I nor anyone I know has ever suffered from any milk related illness.

These are just three examples of stupid laws.

Can you think of others?

Leave a comment, because for sure I haven’t covered the whole gamut.

Change the World Wednesday – 31st Jul

Well, this week has been kind of rough.

Apart from the cold that has devastated Brazil for the last week and destroyed many crops that have already had an impact on the market. Milk has shot up in price, from R$2.70/lt to R$3.30/lt because cattle feed has gone up in price. I ask myself, why don’t they feed the cows on grass? Grass doesn’t go up in price.

LixoatrestThe major upset this week, was the unexpected death of Lixo, my cat. He was poisoned, along with the neighbour’s fox terrier. You can read my post RIP, my Friend for the full story.

Lixo was AWOL for three days, then on Saturday, I heard the news.

My little furball rubbish (Lixo is Portuguese for rubbish) has been recycled. He is buried along with Herbie under a small palm tree that my neighbour grew from seed in the praça he loved so much.

It was with tears that I cleaned up Kitty Korner for the last time.

I remain hopeful; all my cats have come from the street, so it won’t be long before another comes along, that I can repurpose.

Click on the banner for the full post

This week’s CTWW, is about the Tar sands oil pipeline, an important issue, not only for the USA, but globally.

Have you heard about the Tar Sands Oil Pipeline? It not only threatens wildlife and natural habitat, it threatens drinking water. While it directly affects Canada and the United States, it sets a dangerous precedent worldwide … that the use of fossil fuel is acceptable. Let’s raise our voices and let the world know that we not only want to stop the Tar Sands Oil Pipeline but we want sustainable, environmentally-safe energy. Please sign this Petition (appropriate worldwide).

 

OR …

Choose any of the petitions found HERE (or choose a cause specific to your area) and take action.

 

OR …

Contact your public officials via letter, email or phone regarding your environmental concerns.

Because of the anonymity I maintain on the net, I will not be signing petitions, but I will spread the word and urge all my readers.

My reason for anonymity is not cowardice, for those of you who have known my blogs over the years will be aware that because I am outspoken in many areas; an attempt to be anonymous is a case of self preservation. My blogs have already been wiped once, and I don’t want to lose all my work again. Just because I am in Brazil, doesn’t mean that I am immune from NSA; it turns out that Brazil has the highest rate of eavesdropping by NSA in Latin America, and Brazilians are not at all happy about this.

The world is changing, and it is not for the better.

Make you Fink on Friday

Margarine v butter: are synthetic spreads toast?

Sales of margarine are in decline, due to a combination of reformulated recipes, price, health and taste. Do you defend marge, or is butter simply better?

Margarine: makes wonderfully crisp shortcrust pastry. Photograph: David Sillitoe for the Guardian

Butter v marg: it’s a fight that has gone on for decades. On one side, there’s butter – rich, creamy, defiantly full-fat and made for millennia by churning the milk or cream from cattle. On the other, there’s margarine: the arriviste spread invented in the 1860s. It might not taste delicious, and it doesn’t sink into your toast like butter, but for decades margarine has ridden a wave of success as the “healthy” alternative.

No longer. Sales of margarine have plummeted in the last year, according to Kantar, with “health” spreads dropping 7.4% in sales. Flora has been particularly badly hit, losing £24m in sales, partly due to reformulating its recipe.

Meanwhile, butter is back in vogue. Brits bought 8.7% more blocks of butter last year, and 6% more spreadable tubs. This is partly due to the “narrowing price gap between butter and margarine,” Tim Eales of IRI told The Grocer, but also to the home baking revival led by Mary Berry, Paul Hollywood and co. We’re all sticking unsalted butter in our sponges these days.

A yen for natural, unprocessed produce could also be a factor. “Since all the food scandals of the last 10 years, people are thinking about where their food comes from – butter is perceived as ‘pure’,” says food writer Signe Johansen. But is marg really out for the count? Big brands are owned by powerful multinationals such as Unilever, with huge marketing budgets. Don’t rule spreads out just yet.

Margarine was invented in 1869 by a French food scientist, Hippolyte Mège-Mouriès, who responded to a challenge by Napoleon III. Napoleon wanted to find a long-life alternative to butter to feed troops in the Franco-Prussian war. Mège-Mouriès mixed skimmed milk, water and beef fat to create a substance similar to butter in texture, if not in taste. He called it “oleomargarine” after margarites, the Greek word for pearls – a reference to its pearly sheen. In 1871 he sold the patent to Jurgens, a Dutch firm now part of Unilever.

Beef fat was soon replaced by cheaper hydrogenated and non-hydrogenated vegetable oils. “Margarine gained a foothold during the first world war,” says food writer and historian Bee Wilson. “George Orwell wrote of the ‘great war’ that what he remembered most was not all the deaths but all the margarine. But at this stage people recognised it was an inferior substitute for butter: an ersatz food, like drinking chicory instead of coffee.”

In the second world war, British margarine brands were legally required to add vitamins to their recipes. “The move in status to margarine as a health food, marketing itself as a superior alternative, happened after the war,” says Wilson. Added “healthy” extras – vitamins, omega-3s, unpronounceables that lower your cholesterol – are still a mainstay of the market.

But while margarine has spent decades fighting butter on the health front, what about taste? “Margarine has never been able to replicate the flavour of true butter,” says Johansen. This despite the fact many brands add milk and cream to their spreads. “I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter”? Really? I can.

Unsurprisingly, it’s hard to find a defendant of margarine among food writers and chefs. One of the few exceptions is Marguerite Patten, who a fan of baking with Stork. Indeed, Stork does make for wonderfully crisp shortcrust pastry.

Margarine has taken a bashing on the health front in recent years, too. Negative press about trans fats in the 00s saw many brands remove hydrogenated fats from their spreads and reformulate their recipes. Growing suspicion of processed foods has led many consumers to return to butter. As Johansen puts it: “If you want a healthy heart, eat more vegetables.”

And yet, and yet. I’m looking at a tub of Pure Dairy-Free Soya Spread. It contains 14g saturated fat per 100g, compared to butter’s 54%. For many consumers, such stats still outweigh taste when it comes to deciding what’s on their toast. And what about vegans, and those with lactose intolerance? Margarine can fulfil needs that butter can’t.

It will never win any taste awards, but there is still a place for margarine on the supermarket shelves – even if there isn’t one for it in most food lovers’ fridges.

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Opinion:

I have heard it said… or did I read it? That margarine is one molecule short of being plastic. Which just begs the question; would you melt your Tupperware to spread on your toast?

Whether that is true or not, I can’t remember the reference, the fact is that butter and margarine are from different planets.

I have both in the house. Principally, I use butter, but the marg comes in handy if I run out of soft butter. In a typical month I would use 7x250gm packs of butter, whereas a 250gm pot of marg lasts the whole month, and into the next.

Don’t even think about suggesting that I soften the butter in the microwave! I wouldn’t have one of those in the house; I have even thrown a new one out of a restaurant kitchen. Microwave ovens are pure evil!

“In the mid-1970s Russia banned microwaves. Now you may think that is pretty silly, until you look at the latest reports on how they f**k-up food beyond all recognition. More recent studies have shown that microwave ovens totally alter the structure of food, so much so, that it isn’t food anymore.

Yes, Russia made a good move.

Microwaves should be banned globally, but of course that’ll never happen. The microwave oven market is big. Corporations like this because there’s a lot of profit. Because the corporations run America, America will continue to have microwave ovens and obesity, yes, microwave ovens are a part of the obesity problem.” – From a Make you Fink on Friday post a year ago; feel free to take your microwave to the scrap-metal yard.

The evils of butter vs the benefits or margarine were touted by the margarine manufacturers who suppressed all evidence that didn’t fit their claims.

The same happened to natural dripping and lard vs vegetable cooking oils. The same happened to milk vs pateurised milk; I have drunk pure unpasteurised milk throughout much of my life and have never suffered the maladies as claimed.

No consideration was ever given to your health. Oh, they said so, because that’s what you wanted to hear. Nobody ever challenged it.

But people are beginning to see through this veil of secrecy, food scandals are more frequently being brought to the fore and people are stopping to think.

When are you going to stop and fink?

Monday Moaning

split_endsMy Monday moaning could well be about the fact that I didn’t get to moan on Monday.

I am suffering a terrible affliction at the moment, it’s called work. Not just work, but it’s worse than split ends, it’s split days. Split days do not bode well with my post load.

It’s now Tuesday late p.m.

So here is Monday Moaning.

Generation Cool: Self-obsessed Millennials having so much fun

I saw this BBC Headline, the rest of the article was not so much about the topic, but it did give me an idea for a moan.

“We will not be a great generation, we are too self-absorbed, spending most of our time on frivolous things, like posting photos of ourselves. We are cool kids, we are the cool generation.” – That’s the last paragraph from the BBC article.

The Millenials, as opposed to my own time called the Baby Boomers, are about as a miserable generation as I could ever have depicted; totally frivolous and wasteful, like never before.

milk_and_honey

Milk and honey, even the oatmeal is a GMO

What was the ‘land of milk and honey’ is no more. We’ve polluted and destroyed the milk and , as the Brits are finding out, we’ve poisoned the bees with insecticides; so there goes the honey. What we have left is bland white liquid and honeyless love.

Of course, all this is helped along by the devious politicians. This is exactly the way they want it because there are too many people around, 7 billionish at the last count, and rising.

The cure is piss poor education to keep us stupid, and chronically shocking health ideals to help some of us to die off, being so stupid that we can’t see the wood for the trees.

steamlocomotive

Next station: Extinction

We, as a race, are barreling along like a driverless steam locomotive heading directly for the last station on the line:

“Extinction! All out!” Cried the conductor.

We are all too busy being cool, wasting stuff and having fun, that we aren’t capable of noticing our arrival at the last station.

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