Posts Tagged ‘society’

Monday Moaning

This wasn’t going to be my MM post this morning. My post this morning was going to be about the quarry plans for Hopwas Forest, an ancient woodland mentioned in the Domesday Book in1086. But, you can read it on BBCNews and imagine what I have to say about the potential destruction.

On with the moan…

I have been sitting on a quote for some time. Yesterday Lois, over at Eco-Grandma wrote a wonderful post, using that same quote.

In effect, she unwittingly stole my thunder., but I bear no umbrage because it gave me the impetus to do what I had been procrastinating for the past few months. Yes, sometimes I have ideas and it takes a while before those ideas get to paper, or in this case… screen.

Hop on over to Eco-Grandma and read Lois’ post first, then continue on here… I’ll wait until you come back.

Poignant, yes?

breathingmoneyMy view is that our social paradigm must change. Not just change a little, but drastic changes must be made if humanity is going to stand a chance for survival.

I will not beat about the bush.

The western world hs become a fat, lazy, egocentric, greedy, want, want, want, waste, waste, waste society.

I don’t care if you are a trim 75kg muscle-rippling male, or a lithe 50kg female with big knockers; I am pointing the finger at you too! We are all tarred with the same brush.

Our downfall is technology.

Technology has ruined the human race beyond recognition. It has turned a hard working person into a slob in so many ways.

Technology is responsible for over population. Technology is responsible for obesity. Technology is responsible for pollution. Technology is responsible for… Oh, heck, that list can go on and on.

In short, technology is our enemy, not our friend.

We have become so greedy because technology has made us make money faster. Our capitalist world wants more money even faster still.

If we, as a species, are to survive, we need to shun techology before it strangles us.

brainwashingEven the internet.

The internet is in decline, it is being taken over by corporate interests. Just the same happened to radio, television and the telephone; all were great inventions until they became the tools of corporations. The first radio and TV didn’t have advertising and crap, now they are the means of brainwashing society, the telephone too with its infernal telemarketing. The internet is going the same way. It has already become a vast network for brainwashing.

This brainwashing has made us a consumer society. We see, we want!

When in reality, we don’t need.

Society has to retake control of itself.

We have to recognise the brainwashing by governments, corporations and the mainstram media and refuse to let it control us. In effect, we have to stop being sheep and following the flock to our doom.

I have said many times that the old ways were better, the way things were done in granny’s day. I’m talking about my granny, not yours from the 1950s, mine from 1894.

Yes, my granny was born in 1894. In those days cooking was done at home, our food was grown in the backyard, clothes were mended and handed down, pollution was minimal, plastic bags didn’t exist, we hadn’t begun to deplete the planet’s resources and we lived in near rural tranquility with less crime and violence.

In those days, they didn’t have TV which I blame for the beginning of our ills, they didn’t have psychologists, they didn’t have the likes of Prozac to make life rosy and create psychopathic shooters, they didn’t mollycoddle their kids so they grew up knowing nothing about the real world; and the latest… they didn’t have smartphones where they walked along with their noses buried in small screens, they saw the world and what was happening.

Technology has complicated our lives, we need to return to the simplicity of yesteryear.

Recently, I posted The Kill Shot on Tomus Arcanum. It was about the dangers we face with solar flares. What happens if a Kill Shot strikes Earth? Don’t laugh, don’t shrug this off as a flight of fancy.  Last week there was a solar flare that disrupted northern hemisphere communications for 48 hours.

facebookdownlikesPeople had to live for two days wihout Twitter and FaceBook.

Imagine a reall Kill Shot that knocked the net out for weeks… you have a lot of blathering idiots walking in the streets drooling.

A real Kill Shot is just hypothetical, it could never happen.

No? Just 18 months ago a Kill Shot so big that it is called a Carrington Event, just missed the Earth because the sun was facing slightly off. And, if you think this isn’t serious, such a Kill Shot could take the earth back to the Stone Age. Our technology would be down forever.

Just think, no cars, no TV, no supermarkets, no internet,,, and no FaceBook.

Society would have to re-invent itself, if it hadn’t already been roasted.

Apart from the possibility of a huge solar flre, which may/may not happen, if we don’t simplify our world, we are still doomed.

We need to change the paradigm; and that starts with you!

“No, don’t look around, I am pointing the finger at you!”

Monday Moaning

My Monday Moaning has been interrupted by the loss of things to moan about with my recent PC troubles.

So, I am going to take a slightyly different tack today and have a good moan by reblogging George Monbiot’s article about the economy and our need material possessions that will be our undoing.

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It’s simple. If we can’t change our economic system, our number’s up

It’s the great taboo of our age – and the inability to discuss the pursuit of perpetual growth will prove humanity’s undoing

‘The mother narrative to all this is carbon-fuelled expansion. Our ideologies are mere subplots.’ Photograph: Alamy

Let us imagine that in 3030BC the total possessions of the people of Egypt filled one cubic metre. Let us propose that these possessions grew by 4.5% a year. How big would that stash have been by the Battle of Actium in 30BC? This is the calculation performed by the investment banker Jeremy Grantham.

Go on, take a guess. Ten times the size of the pyramids? All the sand in the Sahara? The Atlantic ocean? The volume of the planet? A little more? It’s 2.5 billion billion solar systems. It does not take you long, pondering this outcome, to reach the paradoxical position that salvation lies in collapse.

To succeed is to destroy ourselves. To fail is to destroy ourselves. That is the bind we have created. Ignore if you must climate change, biodiversity collapse, the depletion of water, soil, minerals, oil; even if all these issues miraculously vanished, the mathematics of compound growth make continuity impossible.

Economic growth is an artefact of the use of fossil fuels. Before large amounts of coal were extracted, every upswing in industrial production would be met with a downswing in agricultural production, as the charcoal or horse power required by industry reduced the land available for growing food. Every prior industrial revolution collapsed, as growth could not be sustained. But coal broke this cycle and enabled – for a few hundred years – the phenomenon we now call sustained growth.

It was neither capitalism nor communism that made possible the progress and pathologies (total war, the unprecedented concentration of global wealth, planetary destruction) of the modern age. It was coal, followed by oil and gas. The meta-trend, the mother narrative, is carbon-fuelled expansion. Our ideologies are mere subplots. Now, with the accessible reserves exhausted, we must ransack the hidden corners of the planet to sustain our impossible proposition.

On Friday, a few days after scientists announced that the collapse of the west Antarctic ice sheet is now inevitable, the Ecuadorean government decided to allow oil drilling in the heart of the Yasuni national park. It had made an offer to other governments: if they gave it half the value of the oil in that part of the park, it would leave the stuff in the ground. You could see this as either blackmail or fair trade. Ecuador is poor, its oil deposits are rich. Why, the government argued, should it leave them untouched without compensation when everyone else is drilling down to the inner circle of hell? It asked for $3.6bn and received $13m. The result is that Petroamazonas, a company with a colourful record of destruction and spills, will now enter one of the most biodiverse places on the planet, in which a hectare of rainforest is said to contain more species than exist in the entire continent of North America.

Yasuni national park. Murray Cooper/Minden Pictures/Corbis

Yasuni national park. Murray Cooper/Minden Pictures/Corbis

The UK oil firm Soco is now hoping to penetrate Africa’s oldest national park, Virunga, in the Democratic Republic of Congo; one of the last strongholds of the mountain gorilla and the okapi, of chimpanzees and forest elephants. In Britain, where a possible 4.4 billion barrels of shale oil has just been identified in the south-east, the government fantasises about turning the leafy suburbs into a new Niger delta. To this end it’s changing the trespass laws to enable drilling without consent and offering lavish bribes to local people. These new reserves solve nothing. They do not end our hunger for resources; they exacerbate it.

The trajectory of compound growth shows that the scouring of the planet has only just begun. As the volume of the global economy expands, everywhere that contains something concentrated, unusual, precious, will be sought out and exploited, its resources extracted and dispersed, the world’s diverse and differentiated marvels reduced to the same grey stubble.

Some people try to solve the impossible equation with the myth of dematerialisation: the claim that as processes become more efficient and gadgets are miniaturised, we use, in aggregate, fewer materials. There is no sign that this is happening. Iron ore production has risen 180% in 10 years. The trade body Forest Industries tells us that “global paper consumption is at a record high level and it will continue to grow”. If, in the digital age, we won’t reduce even our consumption of paper, what hope is there for other commodities?

Look at the lives of the super-rich, who set the pace for global consumption. Are their yachts getting smaller? Their houses? Their artworks? Their purchase of rare woods, rare fish, rare stone? Those with the means buy ever bigger houses to store the growing stash of stuff they will not live long enough to use. By unremarked accretions, ever more of the surface of the planet is used to extract, manufacture and store things we don’t need. Perhaps it’s unsurprising that fantasies about colonising space – which tell us we can export our problems instead of solving them – have resurfaced.

As the philosopher Michael Rowan points out, the inevitabilities of compound growth mean that if last year’s predicted global growth rate for 2014 (3.1%) is sustained, even if we miraculously reduced the consumption of raw materials by 90%, we delay the inevitable by just 75 years. Efficiency solves nothing while growth continues.

The inescapable failure of a society built upon growth and its destruction of the Earth’s living systems are the overwhelming facts of our existence. As a result, they are mentioned almost nowhere. They are the 21st century’s great taboo, the subjects guaranteed to alienate your friends and neighbours. We live as if trapped inside a Sunday supplement: obsessed with fame, fashion and the three dreary staples of middle-class conversation: recipes, renovations and resorts. Anything but the topic that demands our attention.

Statements of the bleeding obvious, the outcomes of basic arithmetic, are treated as exotic and unpardonable distractions, while the impossible proposition by which we live is regarded as so sane and normal and unremarkable that it isn’t worthy of mention. That’s how you measure the depth of this problem: by our inability even to discuss it.

Source: The Guardian

Opinion:

Once again, the inescapable fact, we are the authors of our own demise.

We must change the paradigm, not only change it, but halt the current in it’s tracks. Our whole thinking about the human race needs to be rethought.

The 1% that are driving this insanity have to be stopped, brought to heel. But that is an insane idea, the money-hungry meglomanics will never stop.

Seriously, there is a need for a global  ‘French Revolution.’

 

Monday Moaning

With the world’s population growing at an exponential rate, so too are the uses of nature’s resources and we are running out.

Are we looking at another case of the tail wagging the dog?

We are trying to stem the population growth rate by preventing births, when in fact the problem is we have achieved such medical breakthroughs that not enough people are dying. But, that’s a separate issue

To me the obvious problem is consumerism.

We have become such a consumer society that each day our hunger for ‘more’ and ‘new’ has become outrageous. Our hankering for the ‘lastest’, ‘biggest’ and ‘fastest’ has driven our utilisation of resources beyond the levels of sustainable.

As a society our ethos has to change.

The existing paradigm is not working.

We are giving our kids the wrong message, they give their kids an even worse message, the problem is exacerbated with every generation.

Read a great message on: Stiff Kitten’s Blog a definition of what we have become.

Think about the useless products that are created that people don't need. If you can't crack an egg, stay out of the kitchen

With each new product, we have production increases, more materials used, more pollution, more problems with transport, more and more we find ourselves in the predicament of how do we dispose of the extra rubbish generated. The trash is the packaging and the the advertising. The advertising is polluting our media and the internet, sign boards are polluting our vision, light is polluting our skies, so that we can’t even see the stars at night in the cities. Then there is the dilemma of the disposal of outdated products and worn out components.

Society has to change. We have got to control our cravings. Our mentality is totally screwed up.

The scale of consumerism is closely linked to corporate greed. The corporations want to make more money, so they make more products; to sell the products they have to brainwash the consumer into needing them. The cycle is vicious and never-ending.

It is essential that we tackle consumerism before population control. We have to get the dog back in control of its tail.

 

 

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